Archive for General advice – Page 2

Making Computer Issues a Thing of the Past

Managed services

We repair many computers and laptops each week, but unfortunately this is often ‘closing the barn door after the horse has bolted’. Computers have a habit of dying at the worst possible time – like when an important project is due tomorrow, or before you copy family photos to a backup.

We’ve combined our repair services with preventative measures aimed at preventing this happening to you. Our managed IT services are called ‘Proactive Care’ and can remotely take care of all the computers in your house or office, helping to protect you against both threats and system failure.

Here are a few things that form part of the protection package.

Anti-virus always up-to-date:

While many computers have anti-virus software installed, they don’t often have the latest virus and threat definitions. These systems are at risk every minute they spend online, as the anti-virus simply will not pick up and stop an unknown threat if it doesn’t have an up to date list of things to look for and these lists are updated many times a day.

‘Proactive Care’ makes sure that your anti-virus definitions are always up-to-date, keeping your computer secure against even the newest viruses.

Software patches:

Hackers like to spend their time figuring out new ways to break into computer systems. Software companies like Microsoft and Apple release regular patches to close these security holes. The patches are supposed to be applied automatically, but we often find that isn’t the case – patches didn’t download, were cancelled or produced an error.

Our services involve remotely checking that each patch has been applied successfully, and troubleshooting if required. As an added advantage, any time new features are packaged into an update, you’ll find them already installed for you.

Early failure detection:

Some parts in your computer send out alarm bells when they’re about to die.

Unfortunately, they’re not literal alarm bells (that would be too convenient), but rather information in the background that needs to be interpreted or manually checked. We can monitor these and advise if repairs are required.

For example, hard drives which store your information do eventually wear out, but they’re one of the parts that send out early failure warnings (unless the fault is a catastrophic one). We can monitor this and give you ample warning so that you have time to back up your important files. When it’s time, we’ll work with you to arrange drive replacement, making sure to either clone or re-install your operating system, whichever suits your needs best.

Tune-ups:

Even the most cared for computer will slow down over time. Hard drives become cluttered, operating systems corrupt and ghosts of uninstalled programs still remain. We can remotely schedule and run a regular maintenance routine that will keep your system running in good condition.

Our managed Proactive Care service happens entirely behind the scenes, so there is no disruption to your experience. You simply enjoy the benefits of having your own IT specialist team at one flat, low cost.

Start with managed IT services today – for more information give us a call on 01455 209505 or visit our Managed Services page.

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Windows 10 – Microsoft reveals the Data it collects

Windows 10 logo

With the forthcoming launch of the Windows 10 Creators Update, Microsoft has released more information about the amount of data it collects from your computer, and sends back to Redmond.

A lot has been much said about Privacy issues with Windows 10 since its launch, although it’s fair to say that Apple and Google similarly scoop up data from your devices too. This time, Microsoft are saying that they are cutting down on the amount of data that they collect with this latest update and the details of what they actually do collect makes interesting reading.

What data they collect now

Windows 10 Home and Professional versions currently have two levels of data collection – Basic and Full.

Basic Mode is supposed to collect data on your hardware, records of crashes, how good your internet connection is, driver software usage, what apps you have installed and how they are used, as well as other things that are diagnostic in nature.

Full Mode collects the data from Basic level as well as things like your “inking and typing data” (yes that’s right, typing data) and records of system events. In certain circumstances they can get copies of user documents that have caused software crashes and run diagnostic tools on your computer, although there is a set of rules that apply before they can do so.

What data is collected after Creators Update

In Basic Mode, a lot of diagnostic technical information is sent over (see this although it’s written in geek) which is supposed to help Microsoft identify potential malware infections and the causes of crashing, to help them make the operating system more reliable. Also collected will be details of your hardware including the serial number of the machine, data on what applications are given administrator access permissions, your battery life, what mobile phone network you are using, and some other things.

Full Mode has not been explained as fully as Basic Mode, but as well as everything in Basic it includes data relating to your browser choice, the apps that you use to edit videos and images, user settings and preferences, what apps you have installed, internet addresses (URLs) that have triggered errors, total time reading eBooks, visited webpages, the list of peripherals attached to your computer, text typed in searches, words you have spoken to Cortana and more.

There has been a third option, where telemetry data can be switched off but that has only applied to the Enterprise, Education and other specialist versions – if you are using the Home and Pro version, you’re stuck with either Basic data collection or the Full package.

Microsoft emphasises that data collected is intended to be primarily for diagnostic reasons and the Creators Update will make it more explicit what data is collected, so you will be able to make more informed decisions when setting things up after the update. Having said that they are also being more transparent on what data is collected for marketing and advertising purposes too.

The jury is out as to whether privacy continues to be a thorn in Windows 10’s side and certainly some governments are taking an active interest into what information is actually being collected from peoples’ computers and why. The unfortunate thing is that users will not have any choice – if you use Windows 10 you will have data collected, possibly on a substantial scale.

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Orange Email – the End of the Road

Orange Email is closing

It has been on the cards for some time but one of the UK’s big internet companies, Orange, have announced that they are closing a number of their email accounts – so-called ‘legacy’ accounts – from 31st May 2017.

Why are they closing the accounts?

Over the years, internet companies have been bought and sold, including to competitors. Generally speaking, as the companies have been bought up, the new owners have kept the email addresses from the old company going, so as not to cause too much hassle for customers because of the changeover. After all, changing your email address is a process that no-one wants to do very often.

Unfortunately, these legacy email systems make little or no money for the new owners so the costs of running them are not recouped. Also, email technology has changed and improved over the years and few companies want to invest in upgrading their systems supporting the legacy products.

What email addresses are closing?

Here is the list of the email addresses that are closing: –

•    Orange.net
•    Orangehome.co.uk
•    Wanadoo.co.uk
•    Freeserve.co.uk
•    Fsbusiness.co.uk
•    Fslife.co.uk
•    Fsmail.net
•    Fsworld.co.uk
•    Fsnet.co.uk

What you need to do – Home users

When you decide to create an alternative email address, bear in mind that it may be preferable to open an account that is not dependant on your broadband company as this will give you flexibility later on, should you wish to change.

We recommend (as does Orange) that you consider opening a Gmail account with Google. This free service has some of the best anti-spam in the business and has much more flexibility than the service that you had before.

What you need to do – Business users

If you are using one of these addresses for your business, you need to get a new address now so that you can warn your customers and suppliers as soon as possible, as there appears to be no facility from Orange to forward your customers to your new address, after the closure date.

As mentioned in a previous Blog article, it is best to use your domain name for your business emails – and this is actually cheaper than you may think.

If you need help in creating your new email account, domain name or transferring Emails and Contacts to your new email address, give us a call on 01455 209505.

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Steps to a Paperless Office

Move to a paperless office

So your desk is buried in paper, your shelves are overcrowded with stacks of documents, and you’ve carved out just enough space for your keyboard, mouse and coffee? It’s time to go paperless, not just for your own sanity, but to streamline the entire business.

It’s the one move that saves time and space while gaining flexibility for your workforce.

When you’re ready to adopt paperless processes, consider these 4 steps:

Make use of the Cloud for storage and search:

Dropbox or Google Drive are the easiest tools to begin implementing paperless storage and collaboration, though there are others such as Evernote and Microsoft OneNote. Documents can be uploaded, viewed and edited only by those with permission and as well as clearing paper clutter, Cloud storage makes everything more flexible too.

No matter which you choose, you’ll be able to easily find files using search functions, and no longer need to remember whether it was filed by name, subject or category – just enter what you need and let the system locate it for you. Then simply update, share or email the file as required.

No more filing cabinets or archive rooms, just clutter-free workspaces, room to breathe, and possibly even lower overheads now that you could fit into a smaller office space. Digital files will also allow remote access, perfect for working on the go or mobile staff. Access files at any time using your secure login, on any device, from any location.

The added bonus of course, is that the Cloud storage also acts as an offsite backup for you and many have value added services such as unlimited ‘undelete’ – where deleted items are retrievable at any time, so you don’t have to worry if you’ve deleted the wrong thing!

Provide training:

Make sure that there is training or information to ensure that all workers are up to speed with the new system and the way you’d like things done. This is the time to set standards for file and folder names, new collaboration and security rules. Long-term adoption will require cooperation from workers at all levels of the business, and training for everyone will go a long way towards success.

Scan necessary papers:

The move towards digital files often requires a step back to scan necessary files into the system. Many of the office grade multifunction printers offer double-sided feed scanning, so you can quickly scan papers into the system and then dispose of the paper.

If there are practical or legal reasons for you to keep the paperwork, secure storage offsite is available whilst you use the digital copies for day to day work.

Alternatively, you can obtain special scanning hardware (like Fujitsu Scansnaps) which scan and digitise documents or there are companies that provide bulk documentation scanning for you.

Each file will digitise to quite a small size, so running out of hard drive space shouldn’t be a concern.

Prioritise backups:

The best way to prevent file and document loss is to have a robust backup system, including a regular off-site backup. Treat your backups as a vital insurance policy, so that your files are readily available and intact if required.

Ready to go paperless? We can help. Call us today at 01455 209505.

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Is your password in the top ten worst Passwords of 2016?

Computer security with good passwords

When the worst (or most guessable) passwords for 2016 were compiled from data breaches in the past year, the results tended to confirm what we have found in many cases – that many people are still using passwords that are so easy to guess that they are a hackers dream.

You can have the best antivirus protection in the world, but using an easy password means that you are just allowing people access as if you had just left your password on a post-it note stuck on the computer (and we’ve seen that too!).

You won’t need 3 guesses what the top two most common passwords are – 123456 and password – are you using one of them?

The Top Ten most used passwords

The top ten as compiled are: –

1.    123456
2.    password
3.    welcome
4.    ninja
5.    abc123
6.    123456789
7.    12345678
8.    sunshine
9.    princess
10.    qwerty

Is yours one of these, or a combination such as password1?

Other research shows that key combinations are becoming a favourite, such as zaq11qaz and other keys taken from patterns on your keyboard. The problem is that if someone wants to try to get into your computer, it isn’t just a question of some person guessing all the possibilities and typing them in – there are programs built specifically to try password combinations much faster than a human being can do, when typing in details.

These programs are designed to target all the common passwords first, such as names and, of course, the likes of password and 123456. They go through more and more possible combinations, knowing that most people tend to take a less complicated approach to their passwords and as such they may strike lucky.

How can you make your passwords harder

There was a time when the general approach was to have a minimum of 8 characters in your password, using letters and numbers. The advice now is to have a minimum of 12 characters (although 16 characters is becoming more popular), again with a combination of letters and numbers but also using capitals and where possible, using special characters such as @ and ! However some websites do not allow the use of special characters, in which case you would need to stick to the alphanumeric method.

Make your passwords impenetrable but memorable

If you have a secure password such as hGu7vyXakeTgo034 it can hardly be classed as memorable and with good reason. So the ‘sweet spot’ is to have a password that is just as complicated, but is one which you can recall without too much trouble.

We recommend a phrase that you can easily recall but substituting letters with numbers, capitals and if possible, special characters, such as wEd0coMPu73rR3P@irs – a version of “wedocomputerrepairs” – just come up with a phrase that means something to you but which you can change enough to be effective.

There are also paid and free password manager programs that you can use, which encrypt and remember passwords for you, but make sure that you use a reputable program, so research such as program reviews is important.

Also, as we have advised previously, try not to re-use passwords if at all possible.

It’s easier than you think to make it harder for your password to be compromised, yet many people do not take this important step. The fact is that you need a good password every bit as much as you need protection from viruses and malware – they are both important.

If you would like advice on securing your computer, give us a call on 01455 209505.

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When and Why you should use Remote Support

Remote Support

If you’ve ever had a sudden computer problem, you know it can be very stressful. So much of our day-to-day life requires having access to a working computer. Homework, budgeting, bills, even browsing emails can all have a degree of urgency that mean having a broken computer isn’t comfortable for long.

Your computer technician offers two options: remote repair or technician visit. Which is the best choice for you?

Benefits of Remote Support

Cost: If remote repair is a possibility, your technician can connect via the Internet and can investigate the problem – using specialist software that allows a technician to use their own screen, keyboard and mouse as if they were sitting right there in front of your computer.  You can watch while they work or you might also choose to just leave it turned on so the Tech conducts the repair, whilst you do something else. Depending on how long it takes, it will be much cheaper than a visit, for obvious reasons.

Speed: Remote support is great for troubleshooting issues and in many cases we connect remotely and find that it is a setting that is wrong, or some other issue that does not take long to rectify. Seeing the actual problem is much better when diagnosing faults and having a technician checking your computer, possibly within minutes of your call, is better than waiting.

Convenience: As we come to customers’ Homes and Offices, you already get to skip the unpleasant tasks of unplugging the PC, untangling the cables and carting it into a repair store – and back.

Apart from the speed and cost benefits, we find that we are also using Remote support for other things apart from repair, such as our computer tuition – showing customers how to do things with their computer – which is very handy when you don’t have to go outside your home or office to learn it.

Negatives of Remote Support

Repair options: A remote connection can only repair certain software problems, not hardware problems. It’s impossible for the technician to swap out a failed part remotely, and unless you’re confident in your own repair skills, guided physical repair isn’t viable either.

Occasionally the problem will also be outside the computer, perhaps a troublesome peripheral or connection. Your technician may be able to walk you through correcting some of these minor problems yourself, but many require a physical call-out.

Connection speed: Obviously an internet connection is needed and a slow or unstable connection will make a remote repair take longer and increase the difficulty of the task. The extended time impacts the cost for the call, and in extreme cases, can negate any benefits of skipping the physical inspection. Your connection needs to allow the technician to see real-time responses as if they were sitting there in person.

Accessibility: If your computer won’t start or can’t connect to the Internet at all, your technician can’t log in. This includes seeing a ‘blue screen of death’, boot failure and Windows load failure. As much as they’d like to help you, being able to log in to your system is a vital step in the remote repair process.

Trust: You must be careful who you allow to connect to your computer. For example, a scammer remotely connecting to your computer can wreak havoc without you knowing, so it’s vital that you choose a company (or person) that you can trust who will not do anything untoward. Just apply the same caution that you would when allowing any person to look at your computer or even come into your home.

Remote support and repair is the ideal situation, purely for speed and convenience. As a bonus, in the event the remote repair is unsuccessful, it also means your tech now has a better idea of the problem and can speed up any on-site or in-store repairs.  Remote support is the best option for many repairs and gets your computer working again with minimal disruption and lowest cost.

Need a repair? Call us at 01455 209505 for rapid remote support.

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Windows 10 Creators Update Coming Soon

Windows 10 logo

In April 2017 Microsoft will begin rolling out the next major Update to the Windows 10 operating system, which they are calling the ‘Creators Update’. Even though this may dismay many people who remember the issues that they had with the ‘Anniversary’ update in 2016, Windows 10 has been specifically designed to have these major updates in much the same way as Apple OSX and iOS does.

Privacy changes

Microsoft has been heavily criticised since releasing Windows 10 because of the amount of private data it collects about users by default – that is unless the data collection is switched off in settings that most people wouldn’t look for. In the Creators Update, users will see a Privacy Settings page when installing initially (or after a major Update) with toggle controls that go into much more detail about privacy settings such as Location and relevant ads. Unfortunately the telemetry and diagnostic data that Windows 10 collects cannot be switched off and the choice will be either minimal data sent or all data is sent to Microsoft – there will be no middle ground.

There is also a ‘Privacy Dashboard’ now available through your Microsoft account, which allows you to manage data collected, such as browsing data and the data that Cortana collects.

Gamer Friendly

The Creators Update includes a Gaming Options section as well as a Game Mode, which tries to tweak hardware resources in a gamer-friendly way. There will also more Xbox compatibility involving streaming and chat.

Paint Revamped

The venerable love-it-or-hate-it ‘Paint’ program will include 3D capability and is believed to include tools and filters that assist in image manipulation, 2D-3D conversion and more sophisticated functions.

Windows Update Improvements

Windows Update has been a necessary evil for many years but even more so with Windows 10, after all Windows Update was the main reason why so many people had their computers ‘upgraded’ to Windows 10 whether they wanted it or not!

If you have the ‘Professional’, ‘Enterprise’ or ‘Educational’ version of Windows 10, you will be able to defer Updates for longer – unfortunately ‘Home’ version users will still be the Windows Update ‘guinea pigs’.

Windows Update ‘Active Hours’ will now be available which many people will be pleased about as it will allow you greater control over when Updates are installed. You will be able to tell the computer what times you want Updates installed and more importantly, when you don’t want them installed – so there should be fewer reboots at the worst possible time in future!

Microsoft Edge Tweaks

Changes will include Microsoft Wallet support, a ‘Set Aside’ function to stash your browser tabs for later, and a Tab Previews bar which allows you to view thumbnails of open tabs.

It will be interesting to see how Edge matures, although many people are still a little sceptical at the moment.

Theme Improvements

There will be enhanced support for customising the look of your computer and you can buy more Themes from – you guessed it – the Windows Store. This will be a welcome addition for the many people we see who do not go for the dark look out of the box.

Windows Defender

The built-in antivirus app in Windows 10 will get more functions, including new scanning options and reports on computer performance and health (much like paid versions). Strangely, it will also include a ‘Refresh Windows’ option, which is a nuclear option that you need to be very careful of, as it removes apps and programs that did not come with the computer.

There are many more changes and tweaks coming with the Creators Update, including being able to drag Start Menu Apps on top of each other (effectively grouping them as if in a folder), Virtual Reality support, automatic locking of the computer when walking away from it, EBooks, Cortana Monthly Reminders and many others.

As this is the new way of getting the “latest and greatest” version of Windows, Windows users will have to get used to getting larger updates at regular intervals which are essentially the equivalent of Windows 10.1, 10.2, etc., although this fact may not be good news for those who still have low broadband speed.

Before doing any kind of upgrades (especially significant Updates like this one), do make sure that you have backups of all your important personal files first. Some updates do go wrong and you need that peace of mind beforehand.

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Browser HTTP – HTTPS warnings and what they mean

HTTPS secure connection in browser

There are two common ways that you can access the internet using an internet browser like Firefox, Chrome, Safari, etc. and they are called HTTP and HTTPS. Some of the main browsers may now start displaying warnings that they didn’t before and this will explain why and what they mean.

HTTP is the standard method of accessing websites and you can see it in the address bar of your browser, when you see a website address such as http://www.example.com.

HTTPS is more secure because it creates an encrypted connection between you and your online bank, or a website that you are ordering something from – a website that you may be giving your credit card details to. This is achieved by websites using special security certificates that the browser can verify as secure and you can tell this by seeing the green padlock where the website address is. In some cases, there is a padlock (as the picture above) or the whole website address may be shown in green in your browser.

HTTPS is becoming the preferred choice

Until recently, the main use of HTTPS was to protect financial transactions or personal information from being intercepted. This is now changing because there are many benefits in making all websites use it, even when not doing those transactions. For example, if you are logging into something like Facebook, a membership website or forum, it is better to have your login details protected if possible rather than going over the internet unencrypted.

Also, it makes it more difficult for those people who create malicious websites that imitate a genuine website, in order to get you to hand over personal information.

Browsers are highlighting HTTP/HTTPS

Google Chrome announced a while ago that starting this year, they are changing the way the browser shows websites, in that Chrome will start to identify any website that isn’t using HTTPS – whether the website is a financial one or not.

So if you login to something or enter important information, you may now see: –

Chrome security warnings

Similarly, Firefox is now flagging non-HTTPS websites and when there is a website with a login, this warning is displayed advising you that the connection is not secure, that is not using HTTPS.

Address bar not secure

If you are entering login details, you may also see this: –

Insecure login warning

Eventually, all websites will go the HTTPS route, but at the moment there is generally a cost implication for website owners for the security certificates and setup, so the speed of the take-up of HTTPS will be gradual.

In the meantime, if you see any of the above warnings and you have to enter login details, credit card or other personal information, you now know what they mean and can make an informed choice about what you do next.

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Computer Tune Ups – what to look out for

Computer tune up

Many people like to ‘tune up’ their computers and we often see various programs on customer computers that are supposed to do this.

Unfortunately some of these programs can do the opposite of tuning up your computer, so here are a few general tips about ‘tuning up’.

Registry cleaning programs

Avoid them – even Techs do not go into the Windows Registry unless they have to. The Registry in Windows is one of the most important files on your computer and contains all the settings necessary for your computer to work properly. It is so important that if there’s a problem with the Registry file, it can cripple the computer and in some cases, you would need to reinstall Windows if the Registry was corrupted.

Many ‘tune up’ programs include a Registry cleaning element and even with best efforts, a Registry cleaning program can delete or corrupt important information. Is it worth it – especially when you bear in mind that the people who make Windows, do not supply a Registry Cleaner program themselves.

If you do decide to go ahead and ‘clean’ your Registry, make sure that you do create a Registry backup, and just as importantly, know how to replace it if things go wrong.

Tune up programs

There are many of them available, both free and commercial – there are too many programs to list here but it is best to stick to well-known programs from established manufacturers. We recommend that before using any of them, research them on a search engine first to find out if they are any good or should be avoided. You do need to check exactly what they do and if in doubt, deselect the parts of the program that you are not sure about, such as anything to do with the Registry.

Some so-called tune-up programs are simply a scam – they do not do what they say they do and just look good – but are there just to take your money. Some programs are poorly written and can damage your data.

There are also many fake tune-up programs out there that contain malware, so be very careful what links you click on, as you may get a nasty surprise and it won’t be a tune up!

If you ever see a tune-up program appear that you have not deliberately installed yourself, you can be fairly certain that it’s either fake or a scam – either way, delete it straight away and if it keeps coming back or will not uninstall, contact an I.T. professional.

Computer housekeeping – defragmentation

Regular defragmentation of hard drives can help performance, because over time, data on your hard drive can get further and further apart (because it is split into smaller packets). If those pieces are too far apart, it can take longer for mechanical drives to collect all the pieces when you need them, so defragmentation brings all the pieces closer together, which can improve performance.

SSD drives are getting more popular so you need to be aware that they do not need defragmentation like mechanical drives do, as SSD drives can access information equally fast no matter where it is on the drive. In fact, SSD makers such as Samsung recommend disabling defragmentation utilities altogether, if you have an SSD drive, because SSD drives are rated by the amount of data written to them over their lifetime and running a defragmentation utility just uses up that data.

Apart from defragmenting, keep an eye on installed programs, especially those that auto start every time you switch on, as this can make things slow down, even on Windows 10 computers.

If you would like a professional tune up of your computer, give us a call on 01455 209505.

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Computer jargon explained

computer jargon

If you could afford it, would you buy an expensive car if you only drove it to the supermarket and no-where else? Of course not – you wouldn’t not want to pay for engine capability that you are not using, so why waste money?

The same applies to computers – don’t let sales jargon and the ‘latest and greatest’ specification fool you into thinking that you need to overspend. As we sell laptop and desktop computers, this is something we explain to customers every day.

Of course, Technology is always advancing but if you are using a computer just to go on the internet and do basic things like type documents, then you simply don’t need a high specification computer. Yes, a high specification computer is nice to have and if you choose to, you can go for what you can afford – just don’t get distracted into unnecessarily paying for more than you actually need.

Here are a few things that explain the jargon used in computing: –

‘Random Access Memory’ (RAM)

‘RAM’ is made of computer chips that temporarily store information when you switch your computer on and is vital for its usability and reliability – think of it as your desk, the bigger the desk the more work you can do. The current standard is 4GB of RAM, which is fine to run Windows and do everyday tasks. 8GB is now becoming the standard for business machines and above that is needed for people doing specialist work, such as those using ‘Virtual Machines’, or video and image editing programs, etc.

Above that 4GB or 8GB, if you are just doing everyday things with your computer then a lot of that ‘RAM’ is just sitting there doing nothing.

Hard Drive sizes

Similarly the Hard Drive standard at the moment is 500GB of storage and unless you do the things mentioned above, this size hard drive is all you need (especially if you are backing up externally – you are, aren’t you?!). Having a computer hard drive that’s double that sounds good, but if it is not filled up very much then why have it. In some cases a larger hard drive can make certain things take longer, for example when performing computer maintenance or disk scanning by a security program.

Computer Processors

The computer processor is the hard working component that dictates a lot of the speed and potential of the machine. The most common processors today are made by a company called Intel and the least powerful of their processor line up is a ‘Celeron’, then ‘Pentium’, then the ‘Core i3’, ’i5’ and ‘i7’.

The Core i3 is the standard processor for business computers, although more homes are using it too especially where more intensive programs are used, such as Photoshop.

The less powerful processors will also work and many people do use them, but there is a reduction in performance to be aware of.

‘i5’ processors tend to be used by ‘gamers’ and those tasks needing serious resources, such as speech recognition, Virtual Machines, etc.

‘i7’ processors are also used by gamers but are mainly specialist processors, are extremely expensive and also way more powerful than most home and business users need – it would be like having a sports car that never went above 30mph!

These are the three most important things to look for when looking to buy another computer. After these factors, the next important points are the reputation of the manufacturer as well as the price – genuine bargain or not?

So the next time you are in the market for a computer, don’t be blinded by science or the sales jargon – research what you need and stick to it, unless it’s a real bargain!

Call us on 01455 209505 for more advice and no obligation quotes.

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