Computer jargon explained

computer jargon

If you could afford it, would you buy an expensive car if you only drove it to the supermarket and no-where else? Of course not – you wouldn’t not want to pay for engine capability that you are not using, so why waste money?

The same applies to computers – don’t let sales jargon and the ‘latest and greatest’ specification fool you into thinking that you need to overspend. As we sell laptop and desktop computers, this is something we explain to customers every day.

Of course, Technology is always advancing but if you are using a computer just to go on the internet and do basic things like type documents, then you simply don’t need a high specification computer. Yes, a high specification computer is nice to have and if you choose to, you can go for what you can afford – just don’t get distracted into unnecessarily paying for more than you actually need.

Here are a few things that explain the jargon used in computing: –

‘Random Access Memory’ (RAM)

‘RAM’ is made of computer chips that temporarily store information when you switch your computer on and is vital for its usability and reliability – think of it as your desk, the bigger the desk the more work you can do. The current standard is 4GB of RAM, which is fine to run Windows and do everyday tasks. 8GB is now becoming the standard for business machines and above that is needed for people doing specialist work, such as those using ‘Virtual Machines’, or video and image editing programs, etc.

Above that 4GB or 8GB, if you are just doing everyday things with your computer then a lot of that ‘RAM’ is just sitting there doing nothing.

Hard Drive sizes

Similarly the Hard Drive standard at the moment is 500GB of storage and unless you do the things mentioned above, this size hard drive is all you need (especially if you are backing up externally – you are, aren’t you?!). Having a computer hard drive that’s double that sounds good, but if it is not filled up very much then why have it. In some cases a larger hard drive can make certain things take longer, for example when performing computer maintenance or disk scanning by a security program.

Computer Processors

The computer processor is the hard working component that dictates a lot of the speed and potential of the machine. The most common processors today are made by a company called Intel and the least powerful of their processor line up is a ‘Celeron’, then ‘Pentium’, then the ‘Core i3’, ’i5’ and ‘i7’.

The Core i3 is the standard processor for business computers, although more homes are using it too especially where more intensive programs are used, such as Photoshop.

The less powerful processors will also work and many people do use them, but there is a reduction in performance to be aware of.

‘i5’ processors tend to be used by ‘gamers’ and those tasks needing serious resources, such as speech recognition, Virtual Machines, etc.

‘i7’ processors are also used by gamers but are mainly specialist processors, are extremely expensive and also way more powerful than most home and business users need – it would be like having a sports car that never went above 30mph!

These are the three most important things to look for when looking to buy another computer. After these factors, the next important points are the reputation of the manufacturer as well as the price – genuine bargain or not?

So the next time you are in the market for a computer, don’t be blinded by science or the sales jargon – research what you need and stick to it, unless it’s a real bargain!

Call us on 01455 209505 for more advice and no obligation quotes.

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