Archive for June 2017

Facebook privacy and how it could affect you

Check your Facebook privacy

Finding the balance between Facebook privacy and Facebook fun can be challenging – but it’s a double-edged sword. Facebook allows us to connect with friends no matter where they live, but it also publicly shares information that just a few years ago, we’d never dream of putting online.

You can search for people based on where they went to school, the town they live in, clubs they belong to, who they’re related to…but when is it too much information for our own good?

Your birthday is the first piece of information collected when you sign up, and it’s great getting birthday wishes from friends and family when it appears in their newsfeed. But while Facebook is sending you balloons and funny memes, your birthday is now public knowledge. It seems harmless, but when you call your bank or other institution, what’s the first question they ask to verify your identity? Your birthday!

Some password recovery/reset systems even ask questions like ‘which school did you go to?’, “name of your pet”,  name of your mother (or father)”, etc. assuming that this is knowledge that only you would know. Except…you may have publicly shared it on Facebook.

The fact is that unless you are careful, there is a large amount of information that can be gained from Facebook, by people that may misuse it.

Also, we’ve all heard stories of people who’ve lost their jobs after less-than-wholesome pictures or statements have gone public. If you have a reputation to keep, you definitely don’t want pictures from last weekend’s private party showing up, especially if you really let your hair down. While you can’t control what others do with photos they take of you, you can control whether or not you’re tagged in them.

Fortunately, there are settings in Facebook that allow you to control who sees what information and what happens when you’re tagged. Despite what you may have heard or seen floating around in a Facebook share hoax, you do have complete control over your Facebook privacy, and it’s easy to adjust.

How to Check and Adjust Your Facebook Privacy Settings

1. See what your account looks like to an outsider

From your Facebook homepage, click your name on the blue bar at the top of the page. Click the three dots next to ‘View Activity Log’ and then select ‘View as…’

2. Run a quick privacy checkup

Click the question mark in the top right corner and choose ‘privacy checkup’. Think about what you really need to share – do people need to know the YEAR of your birth or just your birthday? Your friends will still get the notification, and you’ll still get the balloons.

3. Edit advanced privacy

While the checkup covers the most obvious info, you can go much deeper. Click the V-shaped dropdown to the right of the question mark. Go to settings and choose privacy.

4. Adjust timeline and tagging

In the privacy settings, you can explicitly control who can tag you, who can see or share the tagged content, and what shows up on your newsfeed.

Just as you shouldn’t tell the world when you are going away on holiday (and your home is unattended), your personal information should be treated with the same care, but tightening your Facebook privacy only takes a few minutes and it can save you a whole lot of trouble in the future.

If you need help with this, just give us a call at 01455 209505.

Surface Laptop – no more Repairs?

Surface motherboard showing integrated parts

For some time now, many technology products have been produced which have severely restricted upgrade and repair options – when something goes wrong it’s usually straight back to the manufacturer. Whether its cost cutting during the manufacturing process or for some other reason, manufacturers have deliberately been producing devices that have fewer repairability options compared to previous devices.

One well-known example is Apple products which are notoriously difficult to repair anywhere other than at an Apple store (and in many cases they just send the device back to the manufacturer anyway) – third party repairers are not exactly welcomed. Whether it’s a special glue that holds the glass screen in place, special tools being required or for some other reason, the ability to repair and also to upgrade is becoming much more controlled, but not by the user.

It now looks as though Microsoft are following suit, as their Surface laptop has been given a lower repairability rating than the previous version – it simply isn’t meant to be repaired.

Starting with no screws, the case needs to be pried apart and the external fabric has a high chance of being torn in the process.

Once inside, things like battery and keyboard are glued to the case. There are a number of thermal pads attached to the internal circuit board (motherboard) which are likely be damaged and needing replacement due to opening. Upgradeability is pretty much nil, as the CPU (processor), RAM (memory) and storage are all soldered to the motherboard, unlike in the past when customers could increase performance and storage by replacing them.

Some may say that this makes sure that repairs are controlled by the manufacturer, which is a fair point. However the other side of the coin is that in the past you could, for example, get a laptop keyboard replaced fairly easily, but even this basic option is no longer available on many devices.

Similarly, upgrading to more RAM has been fairly easy to do for many years and short of replacing the CPU, is the second best way to speed up performance – but if you can no longer do this, then replacing the whole unit is more likely.

Whether or not you agree with restricting customer options, the fact is that this trend is likely to continue. So when purchasing, you need to bear in mind that any repairs (if at all possible) would need to be done back at the manufacturers or their “authorised partners”, which means that the device needs to be sent away and you will not have it for some time, it will certainly be out of your hands longer than a local repairer.

Alternatively you may just get a replacement instead of a repair, which is okay so long as it isn’t a refurbished device that you get back or that in the process you no longer have important files that were on the old device – so backups are vital.