Archive for Computer virus – Page 2

Controlling Windows 10 Autoplay Settings

Autoplay settings in Windows 10

‘Autoplay’ in Windows was originally designed to automatically open removable media that you have plugged into your computer, such as CD/DVD or USB media – it was meant to speed things up for you, but it has had a checkered history.

In the old days, putting in a CD/DVD or USB media with Autoplay switched on was a good way of passing viruses from one computer to another, as viruses were automatically executed when the media was opened for you. This is why good security programs today either automatically scan removable media when inserted, or ask you to allow it to do so, but some programs are better than others and some may not stop a virus from executing itself in time.

Later versions of Windows switched Autoplay off by default and Windows 10 asks you what you want to do, when removable media is inserted. However we do see customers that switch it back on, for ease of use but this does pose a risk.

Even today, it is recommended that Autoplay is switched off. You can do this by going to Settings > Devices and select ‘Autoplay’ on the list on the left. Toggle the Autoplay switch to ‘Off’, Autoplay will be disabled and you will not see the pop-up window again. This allows you or your security software to scan the removable media before opening.

Alternatively, or you just find that annoying, the next safest thing is set Autoplay to ask you what to do every time media is inserted, rather than automatically opening it. In Windows 10 you can actually select different actions for different media, for example you can set memory cards to import photos from your camera (which is unlikely to be infected). The settings for this are in the same section as described above, and you go to the ‘Choose a default’ for each media showing in the list.

There is also even greater control of individual media by going to the ‘Autoplay’ setting in Control Panel, where you can choose a default for many more options such as Pictures, Video, Audio etc. that may be present on your removable media.

Rather than just automatically opening media, the final thing that you can do is to set Autoplay to open the media in File Explorer – but as some viruses reside in an area of removable media that is read when opening its file list, this is not that much better than automatic opening. We would recommend scanning all removable media before opening it in File Explorer.

Every day people are using the same USB drive in their home and office/business computers, or putting removable media into their computers that has been used in a friend or relative’s system. This means that the weakest point is the danger point for compromising the security of your computer – so the friend/relative that may not have a good security program, or a compromised office computer are routes to computer infection.

The last thing you want is to have your computer disinfected, so it pays to reduce the risk where possible.

If you would like help in securing your computer or believe that your computer may be infected, give us a call on 01455 209505.

Is Anti-Virus Enough These Days?

Is Anti-virus protection enough these days?

Not too long ago, everyone was warned about computer viruses and ‘Anti-Virus’ became the in-word when it came to computers, because the last thing you wanted was for someone to cause damage using a virus program.

Since then, criminals have jumped on board the malicious software scene and big money can be obtained from data – especially yours.

Increasingly the media are telling us that there are more threats than basic viruses now, things like ‘Ransomware’ (a malicious program which encrypts your files so that you cannot access them again without payment), software aimed at stealing your credit card and identity data, telephone scams using remote software, plus others.

Protection – what can you do?

Clearly, if you want to go on the internet you do need anti-virus protection but unfortunately, protection from free programs is not enough these days. Yes they are definitely better than nothing, but you have to ask yourself if big corporations such as Yahoo and TalkTalk can get hacked, maybe minimal protection compared to paid-for protection, is not the way to go.

A good paid-for security suite is the minimum these days and even then, you have to be careful about what websites you visit, emails you open and what you download.

The One Anti-Virus Rule

Traditionally, the rule has been that you must only have one anti-virus program running at any one time on your computer. To have two anti-virus programs was definitely not recommended, as they compete with each other and at the very least slowed your computer to a crawl, if not actually corrupting your data. We have come across many computer systems with two or more anti-virus programs which have caused problems. That was up till now.

There is now a product called Malwarebytes, which has been designed to actually run alongside your traditional anti-virus program, without causing the problems as before. It compliments your current protection by looking for the ransomware / malware-type of threat and assists in the protection of your system by concentrating on the non-traditional danger to your computer, without causing problems having two protection programs.

As it is a paid-for product it runs in real time, bolstering the protection of your system. As the threats particularly of Ransomware are becoming a problem, especially for businesses, it is recommended to seriously think about adding to the scope of your protection.

Ultimately, no protection system is guaranteed 100% effective as they are always catching up with the “bad guys”, but it is worth considering whether or not one protection program is enough these days, bearing in mind online banking and other day-to-day internet use that involves sensitive personal and financial information.

If you do decide to go down the additional protection route, we can supply Malwarebytes at below retail prices, so if interested give us a call on 01455 209505.

Free Antivirus – is it letting you down?

Free antivirus - is it good enough?

One of the best ways to avoid a computer virus is by using common sense, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be safe from attack. Even the most careful user can find themselves infected in an instant and spreading the virus faster than a sneeze in flu season. It’s why antivirus software is still the first package we install on all systems – because you never know when you’ll be attacked. But should you choose free or paid antivirus?

Advertising in the program

Much like a free mobile app making its fortune with in-app purchases, the free antivirus software will push for payment. Expect popup boxes pestering you to sign up to the paid version with some free options also trying to change your browser home page and default search engine, an inconvenience you may be stuck with. Paid options are more respectful and largely invisible unless they’ve detected a problem.

Effectiveness of free antivirus

It’s fair to expect your antivirus to detect malware, and testing showed that in a head-to-head battle free and paid are about equal at catching known infections – although some are better than others as you would expect. Unfortunately,  free antivirus generally needs to have recorded a virus into its virus lists before it can detect it. Paid antivirus is more likely to identify and stop a new virus because it also bases the detection on suspicious behaviour, the source and its attributes, a far more effective method of detection.

Features in free versions

Free antivirus programs are usually created from the paid version, taking out everything except the bare minimum. In your free version, it is unlikely that you will have all the advanced features like spam filters, firewalls, parental controls and secure web browsing. Some paid antivirus will also update your other software packages, forming a more secure protection against attacks. For example, you might view a malicious image file that takes advantage of an exploit in your PDF software so anything that reminds you to update your PDF program is a good thing. Unfortunately, hackers have advanced beyond simple tactics and it’s not just about avoiding email attachments anymore.


Free antivirus options are the most popular choice because they’re… free. Obviously.  This also means there’s generally little or no support available. If there’s a problem or conflict, you may find yourself without protection until it can be resolved. Paid antivirus options usually include telephone support, ready to help with problems ranging from installation to system diagnostics.

Ease of use and flexibility

Depending on what you use your computer for, this may be an important concern. Free antivirus options are easy to install and use, but are very limited in their flexibility. They come as-is, meaning you can’t pick and choose what it monitors or how it reacts. For example, users occasionally find it necessary to disable ALL protections in order to install or play a network game. Paid versions are more likely to allow you to adapt the way the antivirus runs, switching features on and off as required e.g. many paid antivirus programs have a ‘gaming mode’ available, which restricts interference by the antivirus product.

Free antivirus is fine for very basic protection or those with an older PC. In these cases, something is always better than nothing. But we generally recommend that you go with a paid antivirus to defend you from the new attacks that are released daily, and to ensure you’ve got solid protection that will make a real difference to your digital safety.

If you want to upgrade to a paid antivirus, give us a call on 01455 209505.

Potentially Unwanted Programs

Too many toolbars are PUPs

Everyone has heard of the term ‘computer virus’ and many people have also heard of the term ‘malware’. Unfortunately there is a less well-known term – a Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP).

This is software that may be clogging up your computer, yet is not classed as a virus or malware. They can cause problems when they are downloaded and installed, but what makes a PUP different is that when you install one, you are giving consent for the installation.

PUPs typically use up large amounts of system resources because they are running in the background and generally slow down your computer – sometimes drastically. From changing your search provider for no reason, adding toolbars to your internet browser or giving you pop-up adverts, PUPs can be annoying and troublesome. They are also easy to get.

Newer strains are information gatherers, providing data about your browsing habits and other information which is valuable to someone and the information is sent out for data collection purposes. Some are used to spread actual malware. Not all are as bad as this, but they all share an unwelcome trait – you are probably better off without them.

How do you get them?

Sometimes they piggy back onto other downloads, such as from software websites where there are bright green ‘Start Download’ buttons everywhere. You click on the button expecting one piece of free software and end up getting something else entirely or something in addition to what you expected.

It’s not just dodgy toolbars or free software designers either. Some big names bundle well-meaning PUPs in their downloads, for example Adobe Reader can give you the option to download an on-demand virus scanning program unless you spot it on the webpage, or a Java download asking if you want to install a toolbar, change your search engine or other setting when installing the program.

The more dodgy variety of PUP relies on you not wanting to read through the long licensing blurb displayed on the screen (the EULA). By clicking on the ‘Accept’ button, you are effectively giving them permission to install and in the case of the dodgy variety, protection from any legal action.

The question is that it’s easy to click away and miss something – you do need to watch what you click on.

Why do you get them?

“Free” software makers make money from them – for example, every toolbar installed earns them money.

Companies that give you the option to download them in addition to their own product, may also make money promoting the additional software.

PUPs are also friendly with each other, so when you get one it may bring along some of its PUP friends as well, to make some more money on the side.

Won’t my anti-virus program catch them?

Not necessarily. The issue is that technically, a PUP can be legal software in spite of the way it is used and some antivirus vendors choose to be strict about detecting them, whilst others are not so strict. Even if it is not switched on by default, many antivirus programs have a setting to configure the antivirus to look for PUPs, so it’s worth checking yours.

The important thing is to be watchful, especially when downloading and installing programs.

Beware the Google Chrome Font Scam

Google Chrome font scam

If you are using the popular Google Chrome browser and open a website that has text that looks wrong, and then see a pop-up window saying that a font is missing that needs to be downloaded, do not download it – it is a scam being used by hackers!

Needless to say that this is not a genuine message from Chrome and reports are coming in that websites that are infected with this malware are causing text in their webpage to display incorrectly, with visitors using Chrome to see the above window saying that a font was not found and that the ‘Chrome Font Pack’ needs to be downloaded to see the web page properly.

This is a scam and if you download the “Font Pack” you will actually download malicious software. It is believed that the download is monitoring software designed to snoop on your computer – although some cases of ransomware have been using it to encrypt your personal files.

The problem is that this pop-up window looks legitimate and already users in the UK are being caught out with this.

So if you see this font message appear on a webpage, leave the website immediately and whatever you do, don’t download the software!

How can I tell if my computer is infected?

Virus infection

One of the common questions we are asked, is how to tell if a computer is infected? Some computer viruses are getting ‘clever’ by deliberately making themselves as stealthy as possible, so that they can do their work without you ever knowing.

Luckily, most of them can still be spotted, if you know where to look or what to look for – especially if there is a combination of symptoms.

Computer is running slow?

The general rule is that computers tend to get a bit slower over time just in normal use, so you need to be careful here. The more that computers are used and the older the technology in them, the more likely it is that the computer will take a little longer to do things than when it was new.

If however, your computer gets slower in a short period of time, that is a possible indication that something is amiss.

Where has my search engine gone?!

You switch your computer on, you want to do an internet search and suddenly Google, Bing or whatever search engine you normally use, is no longer there.

Although some people can inadvertently change the search engine in their internet browser, the majority of cases we see are that the search has been changed without your permission. This is classic computer malware behaviour (malicious software).

Unfortunately in many cases it isn’t a simple task to get rid of them by changing the setting back to what it should be, because they tend to reinsert themselves.

Pop-ups, pop-ups and more pop-ups!

If you are getting pop-up windows appearing, particularly advert-style ones, then again this is a classic symptom that you may be infected.

These annoying windows can appear even though you may have switched off pop-up windows in your internet browser and are usually scam-type infections, trying to convince you to spend money on computer programs and the like.

New icons on your desktop

Quite often we see icons on customer desktops that the customer has no recollection installing – particularly for so-called optimisation or driver update programs.

Many free downloads contain links to other software that is downloaded at the same time and whilst this extra software may not be classed as a virus in itself, they are classed as ‘Potentially Unwanted Programs’ and are automatically removed when professional technicians disinfect a computer. They were installed without your express permission, are hoaxes or simply don’t really do what they say that they do.

If you suspect that your computer is infected, give us a call on 01455 209505 and we can check your computer for you.